• INVESTIGATIONS WITH INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE DEAF

    For individuals who are deaf or hard of
    hearing, navigating the criminal justice system
    can be a challenge. Injustices primarily
    result from a lack of understanding about
    deaf people and deaf culture, as well as the
    legal accommodations provided to them
    through legislation. Stacy Jones, Director
    of Investigations for Mission Possible
    Investigations, provides an important look
    at how PIs can provide better services and
    conduct professional interviews.

    Read more ...
  • LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS AS OFFENDERS

    Crime staging by offenders with law enforcement
    experience are problematic for investigators
    because the actual presentation and position
    of the body in the scene, as well as the crime
    scene itself, will imitate what an actual scene
    should look like based on their experience with
    police procedures and prior events. Vernon
    Geberth shares examples from recent cases.

    Read more ...
  • DEATH INVESTIGATIONS: IS THERE ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT?

    “…the role of a death investigator is
    multifaceted—one must be able to prioritize
    and multitask—and unfortunately, both for
    investigators and the public we serve, we
    can often work days on end with little or no
    sleep.” Deena Clawar provides a detailed
    look at the world of death investigations and
    makes recommendation for what she considers
    to be “much needed” improvements.

    Read more ...
  • TRAIN, AND BE PREPARED

    “I am not advocating paranoia, but awareness.
    If you train your body and mind to be aware
    of your surroundings, making it so that it
    becomes part of the way you think, it will
    become second nature,” writes Hakim Eslami,
    who is a trainer experienced in keeping investigators
    and security professionals safe.

    Read more ...
  • WHEN INVESTIGATIVE AGENCIES ARE FAMILY BUSINESSES

    More than 80 percent of all private investigative agencies are individually owned and operated.
    However, there is an increasing amount of PI agencies that involve a spouse or other family
    member working full time. We feature many examples in this issue of PI Magazine.

    Read more ...
  • DON’T WORRY ABOUT IT: VISUAL PERCEPTION THEORY AND SURVEILLANCE

    “If a person thinks about only one-tenth of the
    information they see, the manner in which they
    think about that information becomes extremely
    important. The truth about the human brain is
    that it’s lazy and efficient; it will try to compile
    the most accurate picture that it can while taking
    as many shortcuts as possible—this is top-down
    processing.”

    Read more ...
  • USING SURVEILLANCE FOR FAMILY LAW CASES

    “In some cases, problems with child
    support payments, conflicts over child
    custody, concerns about possible elder
    abuse, suspicions of infidelity and other
    family law questions can be answered
    with investigation that includes a large
    component of surveillance.”

    Read more ...
  • CONDUCTING ETHICAL ADOPTION SEARCHES— AND DO NO HARM

    “The physician’s pledge to serve patients well
    includes the phrase, “Do no harm.” Professional
    investigators need to observe the same standard, especially
    in delicate family matters such as reuniting
    long-lost loved ones and tracking down an adopted
    child or members of an adoptee’s birth family.”

    Read more ...
  • USING SURVEILLANCE AS A TOOL FOR PROTECTIVE INTELLIGENCE

    “In the investigative field, surveillance is used mostly as a tool for developing factual evidence to prove or disprove
    circumstance. However, surveillance also can provide information that is critical to the decision-making processes for
    a much broader spectrum of investigations than most private detectives recognize.”

    Read more ...
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